Plants by Post

Pepper (Pack of 4)

$20.00

Pepper (Pack of 4)
Pepper (Pack of 4) Pepper (Pack of 4)
Variety:

Pepper - Serrano

A flavorful pepper with a good dose of heat, the serrano pepper is perfect for salsas, chilis and pico de gallo, as well as for pickling. These small peppers have a heat rating between 10,000 and 23,000 on the Scoville heat scale. Serrano peppers can be grown in nearly any climate, but they prefer hot, humid weather.

  • Each purchase comes with four 3.5" pepper plants shipped in plastic grower pots. 
  • Plants require full sun and well-drained, slightly acidic soil.
  • Plant two to three weeks after the risk for frost has passed; soil temperatures should be above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Place plants 18 to 24 inches apart in rows that are 24 to 36 inches apart.
  • Before planting, enrich soil with a fertilizer that is high in phosphorus, calcium and potassium; too much nitrogen can hinder fruit growth.
  • Keep soil moist with regular watering.
  • Mulch around plants to retain moisture and soil temperature. Row covers also can be used to keep plants warm in areas with shorter summer growing seasons.
  • In hot climates, row covers may be used to protect plants and fruit from sun scorching. If plants show signs of scorch, cover them during the day’s peak temperatures.

Pepper – Bell

Bell peppers are the perfect addition to any garden. They’re easy to grow, and they can be used in a variety of salads or cooked dishes. They can even be frozen for use all year long.

  • Plants require full sun and well-drained, slightly acidic soil.
  • Plant two to three weeks after the risk for frost has passed; soil temperatures should be above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Place plants 18 to 24 inches apart in rows that are 24 to 36 inches apart.
  • Before planting, enrich soil with a fertilizer that is high in phosphorus, calcium and potassium; too much nitrogen can hinder fruit growth.
  • Keep soil moist with regular watering.
  • Mulch around plants to retain moisture and soil temperature. Row covers also can be used to keep plants warm in areas with shorter summer growing seasons.
  • In hot climates, row covers may be used to protect plants and fruit from sun scorching. If plants show signs of scorch, cover them during the day’s peak temperatures.
  • Green bell peppers can be harvested 70 days after transplant, while red, yellow or orange bell peppers can take up to 90 days to reach maturity.
  • Harvested peppers should be cut with sheers to avoid damaging the plant. Use fresh peppers within two to three weeks.

Pepper – Habanero Orange

Habanero peppers are a must grow for gardeners who enjoy spicing up their cuisine. These small but potent peppers are among the hottest in the world, with spice ratings between 100,000 to 300,000 Scoville units. Habanero peppers require a long growing season, full sun and well-drained, slightly acidic soil.

  • Plant two to three weeks after the risk for frost has passed; soil temperatures should be above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Place plants 18 to 24 inches apart in rows that are 24 to 36 inches apart.
  • Before planting, enrich soil with a fertilizer that is high in phosphorus, calcium and potassium; too much nitrogen can hinder fruit growth.
  • Keep soil moist with regular watering.
  • Mulch around plants to retain moisture and soil temperature. Row covers also can be used to keep plants warm in areas with shorter summer growing seasons.
  • In hot climates, row covers may be used to protect plants and fruit from sun scorching. If plants show signs of scorch, cover them during the day’s peak temperatures.
  • Peppers can be harvested 90 days after transplant. The peppers’ heat will increase as the fruit matures.
  • Harvested peppers should be cut with sheers to avoid damaging the plant. Use fresh peppers within two to three weeks. Peppers can be preserved by cutting in half and drying, roasting and freezing, or pickling and canning.

Pepper – Jalapeno – Mucho Nacho

The jalapeno is a staple for gardeners who like to add spice in the kitchen, and the Mucho Nacho jalapeno takes the pepper to the next level. The Mucho Nacho grows up to 4-inches in length, making it longer and thicker than most jalapenos. Measuring between 4,500 to 8,000 Scoville units, the Mucho Nacho is also hotter than most jalapenos.

  • Plants require full sun and well-drained, slightly acidic soil.
  • Plant two to three weeks after the risk for frost has passed; soil temperatures should be above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Place plants 18 to 24 inches apart in rows that are 24 to 36 inches apart.
  • Before planting, enrich soil with a fertilizer that is high in phosphorus, calcium and potassium; too much nitrogen can hinder fruit growth.
  • Keep soil moist with regular watering.
  • Mulch around plants to retain moisture and soil temperature. Row covers also can be used to keep plants warm in areas with shorter summer growing seasons.
  • In hot climates, row covers may be used to protect plants and fruit from sun scorching. If plants show signs of scorch, cover them during the day’s peak temperatures.
  • Peppers can be harvested 70 days after transplant. The peppers’ heat will increase as the fruit matures.
  • Harvested peppers should be cut with sheers to avoid damaging the plant. Use fresh peppers within two to three weeks.